California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) Compliance Services

The Risks of Non-Compliance While businesses servicing California consumers may be enticed to sit tight and await enforcement actions before developing its privacy and data security framework called for by the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), one must consider Benjamin Franklin’s axiom that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Businesses take on a significant financial risk for CCPA non-compliance: Fines – violations can cost between $2,500 – $7,500 per affected individual. A 20,000 CA prospect list that was improperly processed or breached can lead to a fine from $50,000,000 – $150,000,000 (average size of data breach Read More

Categories: CCPA.
Languages: English.

California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), Why You Need to Start Now!

CCPA creates new consumer rights and businesses will need to create new processes and procedures to support these rights at scale. Will your organization be ready on January 1, 2020, to answer 100 consumer requests in 45 days? Will you be able to complete 10s of thousands of requests, covering everything collected in the previous 12 months (in this example 1/1/2019): To show all the Personal Information (PI) of theirs you have The categories of that shared PI The usage by categories for the previous 12 months The uses of that data by category And to delete the PI? And to Read More

Categories: CCPA.

Languages: English.

CCPA – Uncapped fines and New Data Privacy Rights, Preparing is Essential

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) that goes into effect January 1 2020 is a big deal for companies that retain data on California individuals. CCPA creates new consumer rights and business compliance responsibilities. The privacy rights are intended to provide individuals with transparency, access, choice and ensure they are not be discriminated against for exercising their rights. However, the headline is CCPA is a big deal, because unlike the General Data Privacy Regulations (GDPR) for the EU, whose penalties are capped at the larger of 4% of revenues and EUR 20 million, CCPA is uncapped.   Without proper preparation, Read More

Categories: Security.

Languages: English.

Already the Next Big Thing?

Until we started a collaboration with Mike Vaughan to develop one for an eco-tourism operator just north of the SF Bay Area, I was not familiar with the term “Progressive Web Application”. It turns out that it describes mobile applications that are delivered via Web browsers and that are built using common web technologies including HTML, CSS and JavaScript. While not distributed from one of the popular App Stores, PWAs can do much of what native mobile applications can do, and perform almost as well as native mobile applications, due to the ongoing evolution in the architecture of the web. Read More

Categories: Uncategorized.
Languages: English.

State of the Art in Identifying Sensitive Data

Protecting personal information in your databases is a bigger deal than ever, what with the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) going into effect in May and California passing a new Consumer Privacy Protection Act. Knowing what personal information you have in your systems and where it resides is a precondition to managing it effectively. My friend and colleague Luke Probasco, product manager at Townsend Security has posted a nice listing of security standards with lists of the sensitive data elements that each of them identifies; see What Data Needs to Be Encrypted in MongoDB? If you are interested in Read More

Categories: Security.
Languages: English.

Privilege Escalation and Data Protection

A cyberattack is actually like a disease. The infection starts with an attacker taking advantage of some weakness in the system to penetrate and gain a foothold in an organ; in the case of an attack, the organ is often some computer that’s not being diligently managed. The infection takes control of the machinery of the organ, using it to build up its strength and using it as a base to launch incursions into other parts of the network. The incursions probe for valuable information and other weaknesses they can leverage. One of the main things they look for is Read More

Categories: Uncategorized.
Languages: English.

Are Secure Applications Possible?

For the past few years, a number of us in the security space have been talking about (1) the criticality of building secure applications; and (2) the importance of auditing open source components for security flaws. If you have not been following along, applications deployed over the Internet are a leading target, if not the leading target for sophisticated attackers. This Secodis blog entry cites the Verizon 2017 Data Breach Report indicating that 29.5% of breaches where caused by web application attacks, and the Sonatype 2017 State of Software Supply Chain Report, indicating that 80 – 90% of an applications Read More

Categories: AppSec and Security.
Languages: English.

References for Data Security talk

This is a list of references I have assembled for the talks on Data Security that I am presenting at XPlor17, Enterprise Data World, and Data Summit this spring: Intel Security – Grand Theft Data CyberCriminals and their APT and AVT Techniques InfoSec Institute: Anatomy of an APT Attack: Step by Step Approach Forrester: Transform Your Security Architecture And Operations For The Zero Trust Ecosystem Forrester: The Future Of Data Security And Privacy: Growth And Competitive Differentiation Forrester Wave: Data Loss Prevention Suites Q4, 2016 Data Guardian’s Definitive Guide to Data Loss Prevention Guide to Cyber Threat Hunting (Digital Guardian) Read More

Categories: Databases, Security, and Uncategorized.
Languages: English.

The Rise of the Threat Hunter

Where I left off in my first entry about the RSA Expo was suggesting that “Threat Hunting” seemed to be arising as a new approach to protecting the enterprise from cyber-threats. Threat Hunting is predicated on the fact that the perimeter is crumbling and attackers are getting more sophisticated, so you can expect Advanced persistent Threats (APTs) to be in progress on your network, and you should find them before the steal something important. “EndGame” sponsored this nice little “Hunter’s Handbook”; I picked up a hard copy at the show. It talks about the process of hunting, and what technologies Read More

Categories: Security.
Languages: English.